Archive for job search

NetworkingFor many people the word “networking” does give them a pit in their stomach, especially introverts. But, what you resist persists. You have to learn to embrace networking, not just for your job search but also for your long term career success. You can do it in a way that works for you!

This radio interview will show you how. But, you have to do it. Listen  to this 20 minute radio segment to learn how you can embrace, not avoid, networking and use it to your advantage.

Listen to Radio Interview Here

Hallie Crawford
Atlanta Career Coach

P.S. Are you in the ideal career for you? Find out if you’re in the right career with our Ideal Career Quiz.

Categories : Networking
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www.halliecrawford.com – Hallie Crawford, Certified Career Coach, discussing three critical elements you must include in your strategic career plan, and how to define and clarify what each one means. Hint – understand your unique selling points, even when you are not in job search mode, it will serve you well beyond that! Especially when it’s time to ask for a promotion or a raise.

Hallie Crawford
Certified Career Coach

Categories : Job Search
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ResumeHere is a great report recently from CareerBuilder.com regarding the language you can and can’t use in your resume. This was also reported on the Today Show March 13, 2014 with several good points. Some of the jargon people want to use on their resume means nothing or tells the reader nothing. How many times have you seen or read a resume and not understood what the words meant – or felt like they sounded like fluff? It happens too frequently. When you are writing or revising your resume be very careful to avoid jargon. Ask a friend or family member to review it for you.

Here are some of the terms to avoid:  Go-getter (27 percent), Think outside the box (26 percent), Synergy (22 percent). Great advice… show them the results you provide, demonstrate how you are a go-getter or how you work well in a team, don’t just use the jargon. Read more from this report here.

Hallie Crawford
Job Search Coach

P.S. Are you in the ideal career for you? Find out if you’re in the right career with our Ideal Career Quiz.

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Check out my latest video where I recommend a great website to help job seekers manage their job search more effectively and efficiently. In this video I talk more about the advantages of this site. *Reminder there is a fee associated with the site, but users can test it out for free before purchasing to decide if it’s right for them.

Hallie Crawford
Certified Career Coach

ResumeAs you know, potential employers rarely take the time to read resumes thoroughly. Statistics show that employers spend a max 10-15 seconds scanning a résumé to determine the candidate’s fit before they decide to keep or toss. Many factors in addition to experience come into play in making sure your résumé makes it to the “keep” pile. If you make these 4 mistakes, this will not happen so keep them in mind….

Four Major Mistakes: Most often the résumé is your first impression to an employer before they meet you. Mistakes imply an inattention to detail, sloppy work standards, and lack of pride in work quality. You do not want to give this impression, so take the time to read and reread your documents thoroughly to filter and mine out those mistakes. Mistakes can include:

A: Incorrect grammar- your résumé should be written in the first person implied. If you have “I” or “me” in your document, it is incorrect. 

B: Each sentence should start with an action verb.  

C: Use capitalization of words properly – be selective how you use it to emphasize info. Note: Exceptions to the rule include titles, company names, and section headings.

D: Inappropriate use of punctuation.

Hallie Crawford and Jasmine Marchong
Job Search Coaches

P.S. How do you know if your resume is good? Take this Resume Quiz to find out how to keep your resume out of the trash can.

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Career AdviceI was very honored to be featured in the most recent issue (Feb 2014) of Atlanta Magazine in the cool jobs section. Here is some quick advice for some of the common questions people are asking these days excerpted from this article:

Do I need to use social media for my search? And if so – how much? At my age the last thing I want to be doing is posting selfie’s on Instagram and photos of my lunch. Social media can help your search enormously these days so yes – you need to use it. But it doesn’t have to be the way your teenage daughter uses it for example. Start with LinkedIn, which keeps it completely professional. Update and finish your profile, make sure it is 100% complete including a professional looking photo! And start with that. You don’t have to venture into any other mediums until or if you decide to. It’s better to have a complete and engaging profile in one arena, than halfway done profiles in several. That’s ineffective. Remember that employers and recruiters are actively searching for candidates on LinkedIn every day. You can also look at profiles of people in your industry to see what you might need to be competitive – and you can review profiles of those in the jobs you want to have, to determine where you may need to beef up your skills or experience base. Also remember, employers are going to Google you whether you like it or not, so know what comes up in a Google search using your name.

When do I bring up salary? It’s simple, hold the question or discussion until the end when the employer is about to make an offer, or already has or to quote Barrett Brooks (author of career blog Living for Monday) from this article which I think is a perfect way to put it, until you “sense some sort of commitment from the employer.”

Do I really need to take a coding class in order to land the job I want in the high tech world? Before you make the leap into any class or invest in education, make sure first – that’s the job you really want. Is it your dream job, is it the right fit, is it the next best step towards your long term career goal? Make sure the answer is yes. If there’s hesitation, vet that out before you make the investment. Second, ensure that the class will tangibly impact your search or career progression. Ask recruiters whether it’s worth your time. Talk to friends in the industry to find out if it’s a must have or not. Vet it out before diving in.

Hallie Crawford
Atlanta Career Coach

P.S. Is your clock ticking towards retirement? Check out our Encore Career Coaching services to help you define your life – on your terms.

Categories : Career Transition
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SalaryAfter several interviews, you’re expecting a job offer but you don’t know the salary. Do you need to do anything to prepare for the offer? Yes, you do!

First, research salaries for comparable jobs in your location so you’ll know what competitors pay. One resource is www.salary.com. Second, when you get the job offer, if the salary is lower than what you think the job is worth, state your gratitude for the job offer, and ask if the salary is negotiable.  If you are asked how much you were expecting, be ready to state a specific amount.

If you provide a specific amount, state that your answer is based on the responsibilities of the job. Some companies have a classification system and each job within it already has a range with a minimum, midpoint, and maximum. You may be able to negotiate within the range. Other jobs that are not in a classification system may have more room for negotiation.

If the employer will not negotiate the salary and you’re not sure you want to accept the job for the salary offered, you can ask if you could have some time to think about your final decision and ask by what date you need to provide it.  Notice that asking instead of telling is the best way to handle not only negotiations, but asking for time to think about the job offer as well.

Next, choose whether or not you want the job. To help you make your decision, make a list of the pros and cons, talk about your concerns with family or friends, or ask your prospective employer for the names of employees either already working in the same department where you will work or employees who are already performing the same job you would perform and ask their level of job satisfaction.  Salary is not the only criteria to use to decide whether to accept or decline a job offer.  Other factors include benefits, commute time, stress levels, overtime required, and job satisfaction.

If you need help with negotiation skills or decision-making, contact us. We can help you make decisions that affect your job satisfaction, and in turn, your quality of life.

Hallie Crawford and Terry Wynne, Ed.S., LPC, BCC
Career Coaches

P.S. How do you know if your resume is good? Take this Resume Quiz to find out how to keep your resume out of the trash can.

Categories : Career Transition
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Job SearchHere is a fun, informative article from a colleague in Atlanta that I wanted to share with you regarding your job search. Here is good career coaching advice for 2014 and your career change…

Pop culture references & job search

By Matt Tovrog, associate partner of Bell Oaks

OK, I’lll admit it. If I have a choice between reading a book on business leadership and watching a rerun of “Seinfeld” that I‟ve seen a dozen times, I often opt for “Seinfeld.” I‟m a self-admitted entertainment fanatic and enjoy it all – movies, TV, books, sports, etc.

As an executive recruiter, I engage with candidates who are looking to advance their careers and clients who seek my help to attract and hire top talent for their organization. Professionals need advice on achieving a better position, and I do my best to provide that. Clients look for guidance on how to attract “A players” who aren‟t necessarily looking at job boards. I often draw on real life success stories including other candidates and clients I have worked with, and even my own career to prove a point.

Recently, I was watching the movie, “Swingers.” It was the scene where Jon Favreu‟s character, Mike, calls a woman 11 times in a row. He gets her answering machine and leaves a message every time (warning: foul language at 2:19 mark). It is painful to watch, but there is a nugget of wisdom in that scene. I immediately thought this would be a great example of how candidates should not follow up with prospective employers. Instead, they should send an email expressing their interest in a position and wait three business days. Calling and leaving multiple messages only displays desperation and can jeopardize the chances of another interview. In Mike‟s case in “Swingers,” the woman picked up the 12th phone call and chewed him out.

It dawned on me that there had to be other examples via the entertainment world relevant to the job search. Here are eight pop culture examples that provide lessons that can be applied to job search and hiring, after which are real life takeaways and action items. I realize some of these are greatly exaggerated (it is Hollywood after all!), but my hope is these unintentional moments of wisdom through pop culture provide some fresh ideas for job seekers and job holders alike.

  • Cosmo Kramer becomes a ball-boy (at the 3:00 mark): “It‟s ball boy, not ball man.”
    Age bias is one of the most common objections candidates face in the marketplace. They are either under qualified or overqualified and I maintain that the only way to overcome this obstacle is to get in front of the hiring manager. Had Kramer submitted his “résumé,” he would have been immediately dismissed due to his age, but instead Kramer got in front of the decision makers and let his actions do the talking. With today‟s technology and information access, hiring managers can be readily identified through keyword searches on LinkedIn, company web sites and other research tools. I recommend identifying these individuals and seeking a way to connect with them in person rather than hoping a résumé somehow reaches their desk.

You can download the full article here

Hallie Crawford
Atlanta Career Coach

P.S. How do you know if your resume is good? Take this Resume Quiz to find out how to keep your resume out of the trash can.

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